Sunday, 05 May 2019 21:55

Nobody is Lost!

Written by

Recently, noticing many refer to their transitioned children as lost, I began to notice the phrase over and over, and over; “I lost my daughter…,” “I lost my son…” My mind wondered, where did this usage begin and when did it become so mainstream.  In reviewing some of my own writings, I am a bit dismayed that I did the same.  Naturally, I looked up the definition of the word.  In the Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged Edition published in 1966 the definition of lost “(adj.) 1. No longer possessed or retained: lost friends. 2. No longer to be found: lost articles”. Digging a little further in the Word document, a synonym for death is loss.  What?  This isn’t what happens at all.  The use of the word and synonym presumes there is nothing after crossing over, which we know isn’t true.  Nobody is lost!

Grieving the transition of a loved one is hard enough. The grieving process can be hell on earth without support from family, friends and those who know the path without getting into a conversation of acceptable words to describe where our loved ones are. Even with the support of the angels in our lives, it is the most difficult part of being a spiritual being having a human experience; however, perhaps the difficult process could be made less tortuous if there was some education before enduring it.  I guess this is the part that grates me; why are we not properly prepared for this eventuality?  Why aren’t we given a glimpse of the bigger picture, before we have to grapple with our loved one going home?

While here in the United States we have freedom of religion, the many branches of Christianity are still the dominant religion. According to a Gallup news poll, 78% of all adults identify with a Christian faith.  Jesus speaks upon being eternal, as an example look to Luke 10:25-37; an expert in the law sought to test Jesus by asking “what must I do inherit eternal life?”  As part of the discussion Jesus told the expert the parable of the Good Samaritan which illustrated that love and acceptance for all people is at the heart of what it means to have eternal life.  But, just what does the word, eternal mean?  In using the same dictionary mentioned above, “adj. 1. Lasting forever; without beginning or end. 2. Perpetual; ceaseless; endless.” I think it reasonable to expect that Christians understand we are eternal, but in understanding we are eternal, where and how does one get lost when transitioning?  How does one get lost when crossing the veil?  How does one die and get lost, when we are eternal? 

While I strongly suspected that most in the country identified with Christianity, I didn’t realize that according to the one poll I quoted, it was 78%. Having very limited exposure to organized religion up until after Quinton transitioned, I didn’t truly understand what being eternal even meant; it was just a concept or thought that didn’t apply – until it did.  It was our son, Quinton, who showed me, which is totally mind blowing.  Our son “died” and illustrates with his signs and visits that he isn’t dead at all – meaning he is eternal.  As I tried to understand more and discover why I didn’t already know being eternal was even possible, I began to read.  Much to my surprise, I discovered, being eternal is effectively common knowledge even for some who don’t consider themselves religious, or maybe better said, I found this knowledge in books that were not about religion or Christianity.

One of the very first books that came to me, it was given to me within a month of the accident, was Many Lives, Many Masters written by Brian Weiss, M.D.  In this, his first book, he wrote in the preface, “I distrusted anything that could not be proved by traditional scientific methods.” This was before he had a patient that in eighteen months none of the traditional techniques he utilized could help her overcome her “anxiety, panic attacks and phobias”.  It was only then he tried hypnosis did his patient “recall past-life memories that proved to be the causative factors of her symptoms.” His work with this patient resulted with a radical paradigm shift for him; he wanted to share but was afraid his career would be ruined, but finally he did.  He learned we live more than one “life”, and thusly, exist between lives. The simple and beautiful truth of his discovery is, it applies to everyone!  But in his discovery, tell me where is the “lost”? 

There are dozens, if not hundreds of books that shout it from the mountain tops – There is no death; nobody is lost and we are eternal! And then we have our own personal experiences with the signs we received from our loved ones.  Dead people don’t send us signs and neither to do the lost; only the living send us signs.

I will endeavor to no longer use that word to describe a spirit casting aside their human bodies, and I invite you to do the same.

Namaste,

 

Read 114 times Last modified on Thursday, 06 June 2019 22:10

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.